button
button
button
button
button
button

Section 1 - Moffat to Tibbie Shiels

The section from Moffat to Tibbie Shiels is 20 miles / 32.5 km. This is mainly on hill and grass paths with short sections of road at the start and between potburn and Scabcleuch.

This is the longest and most isolated of all the sections few practical alternative but to complete the full section in one day. It is also the section with the highest point (1739 feet) on the way being passed at Ettrick Head. Many of the hills in this area are substantial in size, several being "Grahams".

The rewards on the section are significant with dramatic hills, changing scenery and the removal from the sights and sounds of traffic and busy communities.

Moffat - The Old Clock Tower

The Sir Walter Scott Way starts from the centre of Moffat close to the Black Bull Inn. The route at this point is not on the Southern Upland Way nor is it waymarked. (for a simple map click here) Leave the High Street at the south east corner via the A708 marked for Selkirk. Shortly the route turns right onto a minor road (Old Carlisle Road), then bears left prior to reaching Dumcrieff Bridge at the Moffat Water.

Entrance to Duncrieff Woods

At the Duncrieff Bridge the Sir Walter Scott Way reaches the Southern Upland Way and the direction of the way is now defined by the SUW Waymarker signs. On the south of the bridge turn left into the wood and follow the path till it emerges into a meadow by the side of Moffat Water.

Moffat Water

The Moffat Water is flowing south west and shortly into the River Annan. From here it flows to the Solway. Having crossed a minor road the way starts to climb and within 5 miles the Way will have crossed the Council boundary and the watershed, with all further rivers and burns then heading east to the North Sea.

Above Craigbeck approaching Yadburgh Hill Forest

The route passes through forestry near to Yadburgh Hill. This is an extended section of forestry first on a very well maintained forestry track then on an attractive grass path. This forestry section comes to an end below Croft head and to the Northwest of Loch Fell.

Looking along Selcoth Burn

There is now an open section on a hillside path with a dramatic view Northwest down the Selcoth Burn and beyond towards the hills on the north of Moffat Dale.
This next section is on a very narrow and sometimes steep path on the hillside, and care should be taken.

Ettrick Water near to Broadgairhill

Ettrick Head situated between Capel and Wind Fell is on the county boundary. For the next seven miles the route runs alongside the Ettrick Water. Initially it is on forest path then track, then reaching the open valley at Phawhope Bothy. Soon the way reaches a single track road for the rest of the way to the Scabcleuch Burn.

If the walk is to be shortened on the first section Scabcleuch is the a practical option and can be used if pick up services have been arranged. There is also some farmhouse B&B accommodation in the Ettrick Valley close to Scabcleuch. The impact on walking distances can be seen using this link.

Looking back along the Whithope Burn to Peniestone Knowe

The way breaks from the Ettrick and climbs steeply towards Peniestone Knowe.
After walking parallel to the Whithope Burn the way reaches the final high point where a path joins from Hopehouse using the Captain's Road.

Final ascent for the section close to Junction for Hopehouse

This is the countryside that James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd will have known so well, and from up in this area little if anything will have changed from his time.

First view of St Mary's Loch

The descent is first by a grass track that turns later into a stone track all the way to the side of Crosscleuch Farm. The views are dramatic, St Mary's Loch appearing some 100 to 150 metres below. To the West the views are over a series of hills with Broad Law at 840 metres dominating the horizon.

Final descent into Tibbie Shiels at the SW end of St Mary's Loch

This section finishes at Tibbie Shiels, a small strip of land between the Loch of the Lowes and St Mary's Loch.

Prior to the ice age the two lochs were one, but now this is a pleasant section of land used for recreation in the form of the St Mary 's Loch Saling Club pavilion, a caravan site and hotel.
This area was frequented by James Hogg the Ettrick Shepherd and it was in the Inn that he would regularly relax and enjoy the company of other literary persons. A monument is erected to him close to the road junction.

There is very limited bed accommodation at this point so you are stronly advised to pre book either directly or through a walkers' booking system.

Next section | Home Page | Walking Information | Service for Walkers

© Copyright, design & maintained by I-Net Support       Latest update - June 2009

button
button
button
button
button
button
button
button